It’s Now Illegal to Sell Honey Smacks Cereal Due to Salmonella Outbreak

Every day in America, otherwise responsible parents are letting their children eat candy for breakfast. If you’ve been following us for any period of time you probably know that refined sugars are poison. Refined sugars are a major causal factor of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and almost all internal cancers. So when we heard that Honey Smacks was being banned by the FDA and pulled from supermarket shelves, we thought- hey, maybe they’re getting wise to America’s child obesity problem.

Alas, no. The FDA and the CDC are not in the least concerned about toxic levels of sugar in our children’s diets- it’s just that the Kellogg’s factory that produces the children’s breakfast cereal has been contaminated with salmonella. Yum.

Supermarkets across the nation are throwing out all of their boxes of Honey Smacks cereal after 31 states reported that the product is contaminated. The CDC sent out a warning that 73 cases of salmonella poisoning have been linked to the breakfast cereal.

What’s galling is the fact that there was an initial warning about the cereal that few supermarkets paid any attention to. When the first warning and recall was sent out to retailers throughout Montana and Utah, 27 people had contracted salmonella. But that wasn’t enough for retailers to pull the product. They just sat on their supply and kept selling it, hoping for the best. Well, the best is exactly what happened- if you’re a salmonella spore that is.

It’s understandable that they wouldn’t want to eat into their profits by throwing out the perfectly good breakfast candy. But didn’t it occur to these supermarkets that they would lose much more by damaging their reputations? Who on Earth would continue to shop at a store that gave them salmonella through willful negligence? Knuckleheads. That’s who.

So, you know it’s bad when the Food & Drug Administration has to step in. That’s just what they did after the CDC send out a tweet essentially saying, ‘Honey Smacks are contaminated with salmonella. Do not dig-em.’ It read;

“OUTBREAK Update: 100 Salmonella infections in 33 states linked to Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. Do not eat this cereal.”

As a response, the FDA rolled their eyes and released the following statement;

“Retailers cannot legally offer the cereal for sale and consumers should not purchase Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.”

Then the CDC chimed in again warning retailers not to sell the cereal and for customers not to buy it even if it is still under the expiration date.

Fortunately, of the 104 cases of Honey Smacks related salmonella infections, no one has died. It would be statistically unlikely that anyone would die from the exposure, but not impossible. Each year in the US, over one million people contract the bacteria, roughly 23,000 are hospitalized, and about 500 of these cases result in death on average.

The symptoms of salmonella poisoning are not often deadly, but they can be super unpleasant. They include; fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Cha, cha, cha. It is commonly contracted after improperly handling raw meat, fruit, eggs and any food item that has been in contact with animals.

To avoid salmonella, cook your food thoroughly, wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, wash your hands with soap and warm water after handling food and before eating, and don’t eat Honey Smacks!

As with most common infectious diseases, the elderly, children, and those whose health is otherwise compromised are at the greatest risk. Naturally, what makes this instance especially scary is the fact that Honey Smacks are marketed to children.

It’s important to keep in mind that any food product that comes in a box is going to have been in direct contact with machinery used to move or process other foods. It’s common to see warnings on foods run through machines used to process nuts. But foods not associated with common allergies do not raise alarms, even when there is an elevated risk of infection.

The odds that the contamination is contained only to Honey Smacks is very low. It is quite likely that Kellogg’s is dealing with many contaminated products at this very moment and keeping a lid on the whole affair.

So, if you needed a reason other than heart disease, cancer, obesity, and strange smelling urine not to eat something that looks like giant cockroach eggs floating in milk- you’ve got it.

Check back to our site every day to find out more outbreak alerts and save your body from harm!

~ Health Scams Exposed


Most Popular

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More



Most Popular
Sponsor Contnet

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More