Foods That Naturally Fight Inflammation (and Keep You Pain Free)

Inflammation is a natural immune response. During this process, your body’s white blood cells, and the substances they manufacture, protect you from infection with foreign organisms including bacteria and viruses. Unfortunately, when inflammation runs rampant, debilitating pain and other potentially deadly consequences can occur. Besides arthritic conditions such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, inflammation has been linked to cancer, heart disease, and obesity.

To ease the symptoms of painful inflammation, many people reach for prescription opioids and over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDS. Besides being extremely addictive, these medications can cause life-threatening side effects such as strokes, heart attacks, and kidney failure.

If you’re struggling with an inflammatory condition, safer options do exist. Sufferers of overactive inflammation are increasingly turning to nutrition for the pain relief they need. If annihilating inflammation is your priority, consider stocking up on the following foods during your next grocery run.

Sardines

Sardines, like other types of fatty fish, are packed with inflammation lowering omega-3 fatty acids. To reap the rewards of pain management, strive to eat fatty fish multiple times each week. Besides sardines, tuna, salmon, and mackerel are excellent options.

Preparation is key when eating fatty fish. A 2009 University of Hawaii research study revealed men who consumed baked or broiled fish, as opposed to fried, salted, or dried, slashed their risk of developing heart disease by a whopping 23 percent compared to participants who ate the least amount of fish.

If fish isn’t one of your favorite foods, consider taking a fish-oil supplement. However, when utilizing fish oil supplements, you might want to decrease your intake of omega-6 fatty acids. A 2013 research study discovered fish oil supplements might actually increase inflammation in those whose diets are too high in omega-6 fatty acids. These acids are prevalent in processed foods and vegetable oils.

Roquefort Cheese

Famous for its sharp, tangy flavor and creamy, rich texture, Roquefort cheese is thought to possess specific anti-inflammatory characteristics. A group of researchers at Cambridge-based biotech company Lycotec discovered the properties of the cheese worked best in acidic environments of the body including your skin surface or the lining of your stomach. Acidification often accompanies inflammation like that occurring in joints damaged from arthritis or a special plaque located on an artery wall.

Gelatin

Did you enjoy eating jiggly, wiggly Jello when you were a kid? Perhaps, you haven’t consumed this colorful food in years. Intriguingly, according to a 2000 research study conducted by Cole, the gelatin found in Jello may reduce inflammation and alleviate arthritis pain. Cole cites that gelatin is a protein utilized by your whole body.

When you consume gelatin, your body transforms it into collagen. Collagen is a prominent component of your joints. It decreases friction and might assist with lubrication. When shopping for gelatin, opt for a sugar-free or a reduced sugar variety.

Licorice

Licorice is a plant used to add flavor to foods, such as candies, drinks, and tobacco. According to a 2016 research study conducted by Qing-Chun Huang et al., the active mechanisms in licorice might increase the therapeutic effects and diminish the negative effects of NSAIDS and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, DMARDs. These mechanisms consist of glycyrrhizin, GL, and glycyrrhetinic acid, GA. The reason GL and GA are so potent stems from their ability to suppress the COX-2/TxA2 pathway, an auto regulatory feedback loop. The study, published in Oncotarget, focused on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Besides helping those dealing with debilitating arthritis, licorice is also believed to possess anti-cancer properties.

Pineapple

According to Everyday Health, people have utilized pineapple to treat both inflammation and indigestion for hundreds of years. Bromelain is produced from pineapple juice and stems. While it’s difficult to consume enough bromelain from a pineapple to use for medicinal purposes, you can purchase it in tablet and capsule form from health food retailers. To treat arthritis, you’re recommended to take 500 to 2,000 milligrams daily.

Bromelain supplements may not be safe for everyone. If you’re allergic to pineapple, have kidney or liver disease, or take sedatives, blood thinners, or high blood pressure medication, you shouldn’t take bromelain supplements.

If inflammation is making pain your constant companion, consider incorporating more of the aforementioned foods into your diet.

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These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

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